# 500 • Johnnie Walker Black Label • The Director's Cut • Blade Runner 2049

Johnnie Walker Blade Runner

49% alc./vol.
Diageo Group, Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, Scotland

Wow, we end the year on a high note with a special blend for my 500th review!

In 1982, in the cult film Blade Runner, Ridley Scott, found himself a discreet little star. A futuristic bottle of Johnnie Walker Black Label accompanied Rick Deckard in his mysterious reflections. 35 years later, Diageo sniffed the greenback trail and created a new Johnnie Walker Black Label for the early sequel to the film, Blade Runner 2049.

Johnnie Walker Black Label The Director's Cut is a blend produced in limited edition, developed by Master Blender Jim Beveridge in collaboration with the decade director, our home away from home Denis Villeneuve. This experimental blend would be inspired by Blade Runner 2049, and presented in a new bottle with a futuro-constructivist-bauhaus-cyberpunk look.

This bottling is 49% alcohol, a reference to 2049 of course. The original film from 1982 taking place in the futuristic Los Angeles of 2019, this is a bit my deadline for the publication of this article…

As the Dutch actor said so well Rutger Hauer (1944-2019) said so well:

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near the Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain. Time to die.

Nose:
Larger and more refined than the regular JW Black. The idea of ​​crunching the alcohol level at 49% may be a gimmick at the start, but in absolute terms it serves the cause admirably. Malt, grapes and vanilla surrounded by sweet smoke. You can barely smell the grain. Honey and apples, cocoa and leather. Very nice blend.

Taste:
JW Black on steroids. Honey and vanilla, spices and oak. We can feel the alcohol ramp, the choice to leave it at more than 40% is the best decision we could have made. The flavors are extremely rich and omnipresent. Smoke and leather in the distance. We taste a background of Caol Ila towards the end.

Finish:
Beautiful and gentle descent on the oak board. Spices, vanilla, leather, orange, raisins and crisp apples. Black tea, licorice and pepper. Light peat which unfortunately lasts just not long enough. We want more!

Balance:
What may have seemed like a marketing coup at the outset is finally revealed as a blend of surprising quality! Bold alcohol levels, the know-how of one of the biggest blends manufacturers in the world, future-black branding ... There is nothing here to displease me! It's too bad she won't live. But then again, who does?

Note: ★ ★ ★ ★

#477 • Berry Bros. & Rudd 40 years Blended Scotch Whiskey KWM

Berry Bros & Rudd Blended Scotch Whiskey 40 years

46% alc./vol.
Berry Bros. & Rudd, London, England

Thanks to Andrew Ferguson from the Kensington Wine Market in Calgary, who came to see us at Québec Whisky and that allowed us to taste one of the oldest whiskeys I've ever tasted, a blend of Berry Bros. & Rudd 40 years!

Berry Bros. & Rudd is a wine and spirits merchant who operates in London from 1698. It is the oldest wine merchant in England, and also one of the oldest 10 family companies in the UK. They have already owned the brands Cutty Sark and Glenrothes, before selling them to the Edrington group in 2010 and 2017 respectively.

Here is a beautiful blend of 40 originally bottled for the 25 years of the Kensington Wine Market. It's even said that a good part of this assemblage is Macallan sherry cask in one form or another. No wonder considering the links between Breey Bros. & Rudd and Edrington ...

As the businessman, banker and American general said so well Erasmus Darwin Keyes (1810-1895) said so well:

We must not employ those we suspect, nor suspect those we employ.

Nose:
Beautiful softness, leather and wood, delicate and affirmed at the same time. Red berries, syrup, sherry. Grapes, dates and tobacco. A blend maybe, but loaded with sherry block.

Taste:
Sweet, syrupy, cherry and juicy grapes. Orange peel, leather and ultra-dusty oak. A great malt that transpires the tradition of a bygone era.

Finish:
The wood and juicy grapes transports us to the rest of the experience.

Balance:
All smooth, a nice walk back in time. Too bad that these whiskeys weaken with the years.

Note: ★ ★ ★ ★