#407 • Glen Breton Ice 10 years Cask Strength

62.2% alc./vol.
Glenora Distillery, Nova Scotia, Canada

During my very first article, already about 5 years ago, I had clumsily talked to you about Glen Breton Rare 10 years.

At the time, I mentioned the existence of a Glen Breton that had been refined in barrels of icewine, and also bottled with the strength of the barrel, a solid 62.2% alcohol.

Here is no other form of ceremony the much anticipated Glen Breton Ice 10 years Cask Strength.

As French playwright, poet and journalist Jean-Louis Aubert so aptly put it, some people know it better under the name ofAbbot Aubert (1731-1814) said so well:

The man is ice with the treasures he possesses; He is fiery for all that he does not have.

Nose:
Classic Glenora cereal, coupled with a sweet wind from icewine. Apart from that, nothing to impress the gallery.

Taste:
Arrival in the muscular mouth, barley, spices of Cask Strength, acid honey, lemon and orange. Its alcohol content is surprisingly not too invasive, and even enhances a malt that would be otherwise flat.

Finish:
Long and spicy, it is helped by its degree of alcohol and its particular cask. We imagine here small gilded on the island of Orleans.

Balance:
Normally this expression would not have excited me too much but I must say that its strength in alcohol and its unique finish have me to wear ...

Note: ★★★★★

#375 • Glen Breton Fiddler's Choice

43% alc./vol.
Glenora Distillery, Nova Scotia, Canada

We're back on Canadian soil with a single malt from the distillery Glenora in Nova Scotia, Glen Breton Fiddler's Choice.

Dating back to only 1989, the Glenora Distillery is one of the youngest in the country. It was built by a Scottish architect and used until 2007 exclusively barley of Scottish origin.

The fiddle, as much as it is, is a violin one could say with a popular connotation, which has helped it spread to the four corners of Scotland. For whiskey, it is an unmarked single malt that has aged in casks containing Kentucky bourbon. According to the distillery, it is a spirit that captures the spirit of Cape Breton.

As the Romanian proverb says so well:

A tent without a woman is like a violin without strings.

Golden very pale and slightly misty.

Nose:
Marked by a bit of vanilla, wood and barley. Everything is tangled in grass and flowers and a hint of nail polish. Reminds an average Lowland. A little misplaced anise.

Taste:
Honey and vanilla. Fun spices and oak. Less unpleasant than nose, although it makes very few waves.

Finish:
Some spices in a wave of vanilla fade quickly and it takes little time for this whole experience to be forgotten.

Balance:
Not horrible, but doubly shameful, because in addition to being inferior to the other expressions of the distillery, it is light years below the new Canadian single malts. I do not want to hear this fiddling anymore.

Note: ★★★★★