#330 • Jim Beam 12 Signature Craft

43% alc./vol.
James B. Beam Distillery, Clermont, Kentucky, United States

We all know the good old Jim Beam, a commercial pillar of authentic American bourbons. And from time to time, we like to be spoiled with a special little edition, an opulent traffic jam, or even a beautiful age statement. Here is the Jim Beam 12 Signature Craft.

It is a special distillate of the master distiller Fred Noe, prepared in small batches, aged 12 aged in its new oak barrels and bottled at 43% alcohol.

As the Canadian journalist and founder of the eponymous group rightly said, Alphonse Desjardins (1854-1920) said so well:

A handwritten signature often reveals the character of its author. And sometimes even his name.

Seems rather pale versus the more typical bourbons.

Nose:
Hard candies, corn and vanilla with a little soapy aspect. Walnut accents topped with honey and butterscotch. Dusty mint leaf.

Taste:
Sweet with honey and vanilla. Corn and spices wake up soon after. Quite silky in the mouth, with a pleasant impression of graham crackers and fresh mango.

Finish:
Quite short in demonstrating spikes of cocoa, spices and orange peel with a return of candy from the nose.

Balance:
A beautiful bourbon almost top shelf. From time to time, it is good to leave aside the entry-level bourbons and release a little more sorrel and enjoy a quality product. 12 years of aging and more!

Note: ★★★★★

#248 Jim Beam Devil's Cut

45% alc./vol.
James B. Beam Distillery, Clermont, Kentucky, United States

Today is Halloween, so I thought we needed a little something special, a little something sinister. So I go with this bourbon that has a name and origins rather demonic, I named (because the demons we must name them we say) the Jim Beam Devil's Cut.

Anyone who is at all familiar with the whiskey maturation process is aware that with the years, a certain amount of whiskey, different according to the climate, is lost due to evaporation. This is poetically called the "angels share". Conversely, when a barrel of spirits is emptied, another quantity of liquid remains trapped in the wood. Well Jim Beam have developed a process to extract this portion of the whiskey, portion they named equally allegorically The Devil's Cut, which in French translates as "the part of the devil" or even better in good old Quebec "the cut of the devil ".

It is a bourbon that lends itself well to recipes based on good old American whiskey, such as my Pulled Pork (we replace the Maker's) or my bbq sauce for spare ribs (coming, yum!).

We particularly feel the ideology behind this bourbon through marketing thunder striking with surgical precision on the head of the nail to seduce its target audience.

I let you make your own idea with the following ad:

As the French writer said so well Henry-René-Albert-Guy Maupassant (1850-1893) so aptly put it:

The bistros are the confessionals of the devil.

Deep coppery amber, like a telescope towards hell.

Nose:
Some strong spices try to hide everything, but the rest of the profile manages to come out with a certain finesse. Cherry, yogurt, oak and fruit punch. Walnuts and caramel refine the portrait.

Taste:
Vanilla full of whip, overbought apricots and peaches, below which we feel good corn. The dry wood and the bourbon spices are thoroughly tasted.

Finish:
Sweet, for his alcohol, and long. Top layer of corn, spicy caramel, vanilla and ground coffee.

Balance:
Light years away from original. I do not know exactly what "process" they take to extract this board juice, but it's good for hell.

Note: ★★★★★