#324 • Old Pulteney 21 years 1983

46% alc./vol.
Old Pulteney Distillery, Wick, Highlands, Scotland

We are dealing here with a big size of the Old Pulteney Highland Maritime Distillery, with 21 whiskey distilled in 1983!

In addition to being the most northerly distillery on the British mainland, Old Pulteney is one of the only distilleries to have been named in honor of an individual, in this case Sir William Johnstone Pulteney, who gave his name to Pulteneytown, to Wick.

One of his stills has no traditional neck, because it seems that the manager of the time had cut so that the machine passes the door frame of the distillery.

As Sir William Pulteney himself put it so well (1729-1805):

A decapitated eunuch, it has neither tail nor head ...

Rich apricot jam and autumn sun.

Nose:
Assault of a light breeze of turpentine easy enough to sweep the backhand. We then leave room for barley and spices. We pass after by apples and ripe fruit to finish on accents of wood and rose water.

Taste:
Smooth on notes of honeycomb, spicy cereals and dry oak. The apples hover permanently over everything else.

Finish:
The dry, dusty oak remains in the mouth for a long time, accompanied by small, safe and salty apples. Hint of vanilla?

Balance:
Beautiful blend of beautiful Highland features. Recalls at times some notable expressions of Glen Garioch, at other times a Glenmo, but always with that little maritime side that these last two do not have.

Note: ★★★★★

#308 • Old Pulteney Pentland Skerries Sherry Cask

46% alc./vol.
Old Pulteney Distillery, Wick, Highlands, Scotland

I'm finishing my series of duty-free shop souvenirs, tasted almost a year ago at Scotch Whiskey Club of Quebec, with a must-see highland distillery, the Old Pulteney Pentland Skerries Sherry Cask.

The Old Pulteney Pentland Skerries has been aged in Spanish sherry casks to bring out beautiful notes of grapes and dark chocolate that complement its maritime character.

Its name comes from two identical lighthouses that bear the same name, built on the Pentland Skerries Islands, located between the Orkney Islands and the Scottish mainland.

As the general, a man of letters and a French engineer, so aptly put it Marc-Rene, Marquis de Montalembert (1714-1800):

There are flaws like lighthouses: only those of others blind us.

Beautiful deep red.

Nose:
Smoked leather to astringent sherry. Barely sailor with a vague impression of sherry and heather.

Taste:
Juicy and fruity on a powerful scaffolding of spicy sherry and leather.

Finish:
Leather again, this time on scented pipe tobacco leaves and endless wood.

Balance:
Excessively masculine on strong general notes of musk. The sherry cask of the people. Unfortunately nothing to do with the the 12th anniversary.

Note: ★★★★★