#387 • Schenley Golden Wedding

40% alc./vol.
Schenley Distillery, Valleyfield, Quebec, Canada

On this day of National Holiday, I chose to lay a little criticism of a Canadian whiskey that was once made in what has been the last distillery in Quebec, the Schenley Golden Wedding.

Although the Valleyfield distillery is now used only to produce whiskeys for blending, there was a time when it produced, among other things, today's expression.

The Golden Wedding exists since 1856, but few souls know that it was at the time an American whiskey! In 1920, a guy named Lewis Rosenstiel bought a distillery that contained a few Golden Wedding casks for medicinal sales. The production was moved to 1948 in Valleyfield and its name officially became Canadian Whiskey. Nowadays, although many people (including me) consider it a low-level whiskey, it enjoys an unexpected craze in Newfoundland, where it is difficult to find a bar that does not serve it. Ouch, Ouch, the newfies ...

As the philanthropist and founder of Schenley rightly said, Lewis Solon Rosenstiel (1891-1976) said so well:

It's better to mobilize his intelligence on bullshit than his stupidity on smart things.

Hue at the height of his name.

Nose:
Not surprisingly, it captures most of the expected notes of an entry-level Canadian whiskey. Vanilla, wood, alcohol, light rye, just a few red fruits.

Taste:
Spicy fruit and rye who want to redeem the nose, followed by a vanilla-caramel duo that sadly drowns in a sea of ​​turpentine.

Finish:
Short and dry, without being too unpleasant, but without being too memorable either. Strong notes of toffee and spices.

Balance:
Not too expensive for what it is, despite the fact that 40oz is a long time to be cursed. Moral of the story, if you are looking for a whiskey to cook, it is a more than wise choice.

Note: ★ ★ ★ ★

#136 • Black Velvet 3 years old

40% alc./vol.
Schenley Distillery, Valleyfield, Quebec, Canada

Nice coincidence that my last mignonnette before coming back home comes from the distillery nearest us, I named the Black Velvet, concocted here in Valleyfield, at Schenley.

And at the ridiculous price of 99 ¢, how to refuse? I had touched on this subject when I was criticizing the Schenley Order of Merit 1966 last month, but let's remember that we find 1.14 bottles for 12 dollars in the United States in pharmacy!

It must hold a warm place in the hearts of Americans, for the expression of the Black Velvet of the day was the whiskey supplied to their submarine commanders at Midway during World War II. The officers called him the " Schenley's Black Death".

Today, Black Velvet is recognized as the second best-selling Canadian whiskey in the United States, just behind the Crown Royal. Its range includes four expressions, the Black Velvet 3 years, of which we speak today, the Black Velvet Reserve (8 years), the Black Velvet Toasted Caramel and most recently the Black Velvet Cinnamon Rush. The last two obviously have some flavor added, which would be outrageous if it were not a Canadian product, the Canadian whiskey regulations allow the addition of various ingredients to alter flavor up to 9.09% .

As Scottish comedian Sir Sean Connery said so well when he landed his role in The Hunt for Red October:

Atomic submarines only surface every two years. And only so that sailors can re-engage.

Copper gold color at the border of orange.

Nose:
Dried fruits, grapes and dates. The spicy rye gets into our noses. Cotton candy and caramel with a slight underlying rubber.

Taste:
A little wood. Grapes, dates and rye. Reminds me of a Royal Crown, but a bit more bland. Very fruity and sweet for his age.

Finish:
Little present, little affirmed. Blackberries and caramel. Spices. We leave ourselves on a certain bitterness.

Balance:
I am pleasantly surprised. I was expecting the worst shit.

Note: ★ ★ ★ ★